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Maritime Industry Charges Into the Future

The economic recovery continues to offer new opportunities for the U.S. maritime industry and the U.S.-flag fleet, and I am excited that our nation’s international shipping community has capitalized on these opportunities and is poised to expand even further.  Recently, at the inaugural Tradewinds Jones Act Forum, I discussed the changes affecting the coastwise U.S.-flag maritime industry -- also known as the Jones Act fleet.

Since its enactment, the Jones Act continues to ensure a level playing field for U.S. vessels moving cargo within the nation. The Act keeps skilled American mariners employed aboard American ships by requiring that products moved between U.S. ports be carried by U.S. vessels manned by U.S. crews.  More recently, the Jones Act has been a catalyst for growth in the maritime industry and also our economy.

Photo of Chip Jaenichen

President Obama tours the Port of Jacksonville

Strong infrastructure is a key ingredient to a thriving economy

It was my distinct pleasure to tour the Port of Jacksonville, Florida, yesterday with President Obama. There, the President spoke with port officials about a challenge I saw firsthand as Mayor of Charlotte:

"The businesses of tomorrow will not locate near old roads, outdated ports -- they’re going to go to places where the ports are good, the roads are good, the rail lines are good, you’ve got high-speed Internet, you’ve got high-tech schools, trained workers, systems that move air traffic and auto traffic faster."

Photo by Pete Souza of President Obama and Secretary Foxx touring the Port of Jacksonville

President Obama and this Department want to make sure that America's communities have what it takes to compete effectively in the 21st century global economy, and we want to put people to work right now helping them do exactly that.

You can read the President's remarks and watch video from Jacksonville at whitehouse.gov.

Official White House photo of Secretary Foxx talking with President Obama aboard Air Force One enroute to Jacksonville

Maritime industry sees bottom line value in going green

This Administration has been a strong supporter of marine transportation as an environmentally friendly alternative to road and rail when shipping goods throughout America. And the U.S. maritime industry is becoming even more environmentally-friendly each day. More and more shipyards and ports have made investments to reduce their footprint.

Yesterday I toured the Port of New Bedford, Massachusetts, and was excited to see its efforts to reduce vessel emissions.

Photo of Chip Jaenichen (in suit) touring the Port of New Bedford by boat

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