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NHTSA Announces Final Rule Requiring Rear Visibility Technology

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) today issued a final rule requiring rear visibility technology in all new vehicles under 10,000 pounds by May 2018.  This new rule enhances the safety of these vehicles by significantly reducing the risk of fatalities and serious injuries caused by backover accidents.

PIA - CARS Database System Information

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), within the Department of Transportation (DOT), has been given the responsibility to carry out the Consumer Assistance to Recycle and Save Act of 2009 (the CARS Act) (Pub. L. No. 111-32), which the President signed into law on June 24, 2009. The Act establishes a temporary program under which an owner of a motor vehicle meeting statutorily specified criteria may trade in the vehicle and receive a monetary credit from the dealer toward the purchase or lease of a new motor vehicle meeting statutorily specified criteria (the CARS Program or Program).   

The CARS Program covers qualifying transactions that occur between July 1, 2009 and November 1, 2009. If all of the conditions of eligibility are met and the dealer provides NHTSA with sufficient documentation relating to the transaction (much of which is obtained by the dealer directly from the consumer), NHTSA will make an electronic payment to the dealer equal to the amount of the credit extended by the dealer to the consumer, not exceeding the statutorily authorized amount. The dealer must agree to transfer the trade-in vehicle to a salvage auction or disposal facility that will crush or shred it so that it will never be returned to the road, although parts of the vehicle other than the engine block may be sold prior to disposal.

PIA - Motor Vehicle Importation Information

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), within the Department of Transportation (DOT), has been given the responsibility to carry out motor vehicle and highway safety programs. NHTSA is responsible for reducing deaths, injuries, and economic losses resulting from motor vehicle crashes. In order to fulfill this mission, NHTSA identifies and tests vehicles and equipment, and follows through with non-compliance with standards. NHTSA also regulates imported vehicles coming into the United States to ensure that they meet U.S. safety compliance standards.

NHTSA develops and enforces Federal motor vehicle safety standards (FMVSS), which require minimum levels of safety performance for motor vehicles. As part of NHTSA's enforcement program, the Import and Certification Division of Office of Vehicle Safety Compliance within NHTSA monitors vehicles being imported into the United States to ensure that they comply with all applicable FMVSS. NHTSA has regulatory responsibility for motor vehicles manufactured for sale in the United States or imported into the United States.

PIA - Fatality Analysis Reporting System

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), within the Department of Transportation (DOT), has been given the responsibility to carry out motor vehicle and highway safety programs. NHTSA is responsible for reducing deaths, injuries, and economic losses resulting from motor vehicle crashes. In order to fulfill this mission, NHTSA works to understand crashes and their causes.

In order to manage and analyze the complex data associated with crash factors, NHTSA has developed a Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS). This data system was conceived, designed, and developed by NHTSA's National Center for Statistics and Analysis (NCSA) to assist the traffic safety community in identifying traffic safety problems and evaluating both motor vehicle safety standards and highway safety initiatives. FARS maintains, analyzes, and provides access to data from motor vehicle traffic crashes that result, within 30 days of the crash, in the death of an occupant of a vehicle or a non-motorist

PIA - National Driver Register

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), within the Department of Transportation (DOT), has been given the responsibility to carry out safety programs. NHTSA is responsible for reducing deaths, injuries, and economic losses resulting from motor vehicle crashes. One of the programs that helps NHTSA fulfill this mission is the National Driver Register (NDR), which assists States in identifying problem drivers.

The NDR system provides a central indicator of the location of information on individuals whose privilege to drive has been revoked, suspended, canceled, or denied or who have been convicted of serious traffic-related offenses. NHTSA maintains limited information in the NDR: names, dates of birth, driver license numbers, and sex of drivers on whom a State or the District of Columbia has driver records, but not the content of the driver record; all that an inquiry to the NDR does is indicate whether a State or the District of Columbia has a record on an individual matching the individual who is the subject of the inquiry, and, if so, which one(s). State driver licensing officials use NDR data when determining whether to issue a driver license. In addition, the NDR is queried by other authorized users (Federal and non-Federal employers or prospective employers of motor vehicle operators, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for airman medical certification, Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) and railroads for locomotive operators, Coast Guard for merchant mariners and servicemen, air carriers for pilot applicants, and National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) in connection with accident investigations). Under the provisions of the Privacy Act, individuals are also entitled to request NDR file searches to determine if there are records pertaining to them on file. An individual's request submitted directly to the NDR must be in writing and notarized. All 50 States and the District of Columbia participate in the NDR. The system is also referred to as the Problem Driver Pointer System.

PIA - Electronic Data System

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), within the Department of Transportation (DOT), has been given the responsibility to carry out motor vehicle and highway safety programs. NHTSA is responsible for reducing deaths, injuries and economic losses resulting from motor vehicle crashes. In order to fulfill this mission, NHTSA works to understand crashes and their causes.

In order to manage and analyze the complex data associated with crash factors, NHTSA has developed the Electronic Data System (EDS). EDS is currently collection system for 5 subsystems: SCI, NASS-CDS, NASS-GES, NASS-LTCCS, and TPMS. EDS collects crash data for the first 4 subsystems, and it contains tire pressure monitoring system study data for TPMS. One more subsystem will be added by 2005. The EDS system is designed to collect information on motor vehicle crashes to aid in the development, implementation, and evaluation of highway safety countermeasures while still protecting the privacy of individuals involved in crashes.

PIA - Artemis

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), within the Department of Transportation (DOT), has been given the responsibility to carry out motor vehicle and highway safety programs. NHTSA is responsible for reducing deaths, injuries, and economic losses resulting from motor vehicle crashes. One of the information systems that helps NHTSA fulfill this mission is Artemis, a system that helps NHTSA with the early identification of serious safety-related defects, and ultimately the ability to require more timely recalls.

The Artemis system provides a central repository of data on motor vehicles and motor vehicle equipment defects. Receiving information from consumers through the Hotline, public website, manufacturers, safety investigators and screeners, and other government agencies, Artemis stores complaints, recalls, safety defect investigations, and early warning reporting information from manufacturers of applicable equipment/motor vehicles. Designated officials use Artemis in the course of their jobs. Also, some Artemis data is made available to the public through individual requests or through a public Web site.

U.S. Department Of Transportation Releases Results From NHTSA-NASA Study Of Unintended Acceleration In Toyota Vehicles

The U.S. Department of Transportation released results from an unprecedented ten-month study of potential electronic causes of unintended acceleration in Toyota vehicles. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) launched the study last spring at the request of Congress, and enlisted NASA engineers with expertise in areas such as computer controlled electronic systems, electromagnetic interference and software integrity to conduct new research into whether electronic systems or electromagnetic interference played a role in incidents of unintended acceleration.

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