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Secretary Foxx joins Big Block of Cheese Day with Twitter town hall

Secretary Foxx joins Big Block of Cheese Day with Twitter town hall

Today, the Obama Administration is hosting the first-ever virtual "Big Block of Cheese Day," during which dozens of White House officials will take to social media for a day long 'open house' to answer your questions in real-time.

And we're happy to announce that U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx will participate with a Twitter townhall on "Rebuilding America's Infrastructure" from 4:30 to 5:00 pm (ET).

As a former mayor, Secretary Foxx knows transportation from the most local level of serving citizens and connecting communities all the way to the national level of innovative financing and freight policy. So, if you're interested in transportation, opportunity, and moving America forward, @SecretaryFoxx is the place to be.

That's today, from 4:30 to 5:00 pm. And you can start asking questions now using the hashtag #AsktheWH.

It's only a short time from now, so tell your friends, your family, and your fellow commuters to join us online today!

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Who knew that this was actually a thing? Ten years in the government and this is the first one I'm hearing of.

Is there a better than 50% chance that next Surface Transportation Bill will move up to April, May or June 2014? I ask because many Highway, Transit and HSR project leads, having exhausted state and local funding sources, are begging for federal funding to complete 1st and 2nd phases of commissioned projects. Here are three examples in California, but the needs are nationwide, all modes of surface transportation, urban and rural. LA, having the nation's worst traffic congestion, worst air pollution and fewest Frequent Rail Transit options/per million people, can't execute its 30/10 Transit Plan to address those shortcomings without federal funding. San Francisco needs federal funding to complete its Central Subway project from its current under-funded terminus in North Beach to its needed terminus at Van Ness to connect with the Van Ness BRT project. As you know, interconnecting rapid transit can make 1 + 1 = 3 rapid transit patronage and lower operating subsidies. The biggest obstacle to faster progress with California HSR project is federal funding to close the Bakersfield-Palmdale gap. Once that gap closes, the project will achieve Independent Utility for Amtrak to run from Oakland and Sacramento to Los Angeles (via Metrolink tracks from Palmdale to LA Union Station). Closing the gap will also compliment Amtrak California's existing patronage growth and reduce air pollution in California. When these projects complete, instead of thousands more cars/day contributing to traffic congestion, air pollution and consumption of foreign oil, they'll be running on electricity originating mostly from natural gas, wind, solar and nuclear energy.

In 2009, The White House directed DOT (and other federal agencies) to be more "transparent, participatory, and collaborative" with the citizens its serves. But do citizens feel any more involved in the decision-making for the transportation projects that directly affect their everyday lives? After 5 years of "implementation reports", has anyone at DOT HQ-level gone out into the field and sat in the audience of public hearings to gauge whether people feel like they are being heard (vs. patronized)? BTW: I used to do that when I worked at HQ of Energy Dept. evaluating its public engagement efforts in the field. I'd love to share my experience and help you out. Please respond. Here's what I re-tweeted @OpenGovMetrics (1/29/14): Did @WhiteHouseCEQ ever address widespread abuse of #NEPA #CatEx env.waivers (eg Deepwater Horizon) by ALL fed agencies? #AsktheWH #opengov

(corrected) In 2009, The White House directed DOT (and other federal agencies) to be more "transparent, participatory, and collaborative" with the citizens its serves. But do citizens feel any more involved in the decision-making for the transportation projects that directly affect their everyday lives? After 5 years of "implementation reports", has anyone at DOT HQ-level gone out into the field and sat in the audience of public hearings to gauge whether people feel like they are being heard (vs. patronized)? BTW: I used to do that when I worked at HQ of Energy Dept. evaluating its public engagement efforts in the field. I'd love to share my experience and help you out. Please respond. Here's what I re-tweeted @OpenGovMetrics (1/29/14): @SecretaryFoxx If DOT is promoting #PublicEngmt in planning transpo projects, then who at HQ is checking the reality? #AsktheWH #opengov

As a senior @NCA&T studying supply chain management and researching how motor carriers are dealing with the effects of rising fuel cost and the new HOS Regulations, do you think the two factors together will restrain the trucking industry?