Fact Sheet

You are here

Advice and Helpful Tips for Parents

Private and Public Service Interests for Youth

  • Maintain continuous dialogue with youth about their primary/secondary private sector/public service interests.
  • Chat with your son/daughter while in transit to/from sporting events/activities about their future plans/aspirations.
  • Get your son/daughter involved in community activities for obtaining school and volunteer service credit.
  • Share information about volunteering for public service activities (food shelters, school events, etc.).
  • Encourage your son or daughter to participate in a "volunteer" work experience opportunity with their school.
  • Have your son/daughter prepare a list of possible career choices and identify "pros" and "cons."
  • Encourage your son/daughter to participate in "free" resume writing seminars/workshops.
  • Encourage your son/daughter to participate in "free" interview techniques" seminars/workshops.
  • Arrange a "mock interview session" with your son/daughter for practice purposes; invite relatives to participate.

Personal and Professional Mentors for Youth

  • Identify individuals who play major roles in your teenager's life activities (teachers, counselors, doctors, etc.).
  • Identify relatives admired by your son/daughter that may serve as mentors.
  • Invite a few mentors (relatives and friends) to family cookouts that can share career advice and tips.
  • Arrange a site visit to your current job to expose your son/daughter to the work environment; identify a few work ethics to share during this visit.
  • Use time spent in the car to identify a list of work ethics (arriving on time, being professional at all times, etc.)

Strategies for Identifying Occupations of Interest for Young Professionals (Youth)

  • Consider job security, health benefits, and geographic location – as the number one priority when searching for jobs.
  • Search for jobs that offer on-the-job training, professional development, and career advancement opportunities.
  • Search for jobs that offer flexible work schedules, telework programs, tuition assistance, and tuition reimbursement.

Competencies for Entry-Level Young Professionals (Youth)

Competency is observable behavior that demonstrates skills, learning, and experience.

  • Customer Service
  • Detail-Oriented
  • Communication
  • ArraChange Agent
  • Political Savvy
  • Independent Self Starter
  • Creative, Innovative
  • Critical Thinker
Updated: Wednesday, April 25, 2012