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U.S. Department of Transportation Releases New “Faces of Distracted Driving” Video

Jacy Good recounts crash that killed parents and left her permanently injured

WASHINGTON – U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood today released the latest video in the U.S. Department of Transportation’s “Faces of Distracted Driving” series, featuring Jacy Good from White Plains, New York.

WATCH: “Jacy Good” – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwAUkh_7pKA

In May 2008, Jacy Good and her parents attended her graduation ceremony at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pennsylvania. On the way home, a young driver talking on a cell phone ran a red light, causing a tractor-trailer to swerve and crash into the Goods’ vehicle. Jacy was critically injured, and both of her parents, Jean and Jay Good, were killed instantly. Jacy spent four months in the hospital and still spends much of her time in physical and occupational therapy.

In 2010, Jacy joined the board of FocusDriven, the first national nonprofit organization devoted specifically to raising awareness about the dangers of texting and cell phone use while driving.

“Jacy Good lives with the consequences of distracted driving every day. She lost her parents and almost lost her life because someone chose to focus on a phone call instead of the road,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. “I hope everyone who hears her story will remember to buckle up and put their cell phones in the glove compartment every time they get behind the wheel.”

"Distracted driving has caused so much physical and emotional pain in my life, and I never want anyone else to be forced to go through what I've been through," said Jacy Good. "Deaths and injuries from cell phone use behind the wheel are senseless and one hundred percent preventable."

“Faces of Distracted Driving” is a video series exploring the tragic consequences of texting and cell phone use while driving. It features people from across the country who have been injured or lost loved ones in distracted driving crashes. In 2009, nearly 5,500 people died and half a million were injured in accidents involving a distracted driver.

The series is part of Secretary LaHood’s effort to raise greater awareness about the dangers of distracted driving.

Monday, May 23, 2011